I AM 400: The African Journey in America, 1619 2019

“I AM 400”   THE ART OF JEROME AND JEROMYAH JONES I AM 400 Banner in the collection of VCU James Branch Cabell Library 2019 marks the 400 Year milestone of the African journey in America. “I AM 400” is a collection of original paintings created by father and son artists, Jerome and Jeromyah Jones highlighting the character, culture, and contributions of African Americans during this historic period. Purchasing and displaying the “I AM 400” banner is a creative way to educate and commemorate the accomplishments of Africans in America from 1619 to 2019. The “I AM 400” horizontal banner is 4 x 12 feet. It is available for $500.00. You can reach the artists at (804)...

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JET Magazine: Black Sheep Not Always Bad

Sparked by the disconnect in society with the devaluing of Black lives, artist Jeromyah Jones painted his emotions onto a raw canvas entitled, “Black Sheep Are Not Always Bad.” The oil painting highlights the grief of mothers, Mamie Till (mother of Emmett Till), Sybrina Fulton (mother of Trayvon Martin), Lesley McSpadden (mother of Michael Brown) and Gwen Carr (mother of Eric Garner), who lost their sons too soon due to unjust circumstances. In it, Jones revisits the prominence of understanding a mother’s pain and the actions that led to their heartbreak and tears. In a written statement to JET, Jones said: “One of my primary reasons for painting, “Black Sheep Are Not Always Bad,” was for viewers of all nationalities to understand how far back black people have had to suffer just because of who we are and the rich spiritual history we are connected to. When creating this oil painting I was hurt and baffled by how the world surrounding the black community could still have such a hard time feeling what the mothers are going through. In this work there are two scriptures that paint the picture of Who cries for us (John 11:35) and why I personify us as sheep (Psalm 44:22). Painted beneath the yellow tape marked “Police Line Do Not Cross The Line,” held by Lesley McSpadden, reads the following poem: Black sheep are not always bad, But for some reason they all end up sad, Reasons known are not always sown, The enemy loves to fight when the shepherd is gone. How long shall mothers weep, Watching blood drip from their slaughtered sheep? I see my brothers lying by the roadside And folks passing by like reality died! I guess Target is no longer just the name of a store, It’s anyone who is seen as having too much Black in...

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Feasting on Inspiration

A Delectable Collection of Landscapes and Still Life Paintings by The Father and Son Art Duo JEROME AND JEROMYAH JONES Cary 100 is the Perfect Venue for our Art Menu Opening Art Reception and Dinner Thurday,  May 15, 2014 7 -10 PM THE EXHIBITION CONTINUES THROUGH JUNE 15, 2014 100 East Cary Street Richmond, Va

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Pass Event: Hampton Univ.

THE ART OF FATHER AND SON AS ONE Jerome and Jeromyah Jones HAMPTON UNIVERSITY MUSEUM  Watch The Video: The View at Hampton U. – The Art of Father and Son   What do these “INGENIOUS ARTISTIC MINDS” have in common? Stevie Wonder, Cal Ripken, Jr., Shirley Chisholm, Bonnie Raitt, Arthur Ashe, Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee, Chuck Mangione, Muhammad Ali, Joe Gibbs, Michael Jordan, Dorothy I. Height, Neil Diamond, Lonnie Liston Smith, David Plouffe, Michael Vick, Elton John, Dr. Ben Carson, Anderson Cooper, Tramaine Hawkins, Steve Green, Roberta Flack, Kenny Rogers, Peabo Bryson, Jimmy Walker, Hank Aaron, Willie Mays, Ray Charles, B.B.King, Lavar Arrington, Alex Haley, Angela Bofill, Earth Wind & Fire, Martin Luther King, III., Miss America 2010, Caressa V. Cameron, Joe Sample, Dionne Warwick, Stephanie Mills, Stokeley Carmichael, Terry Bradshaw, Dick Gregory, Dr. Cornel West, Patrice Rushen, Christopher Cross, Serena Williams, Liberian President, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Tony Brown, Natalie Cole, Smokey Robinson, Melissa Harris Perry, Dr. L.D. Britt, Johnny Mathis, Steve Harvey, Gill Scott Heron, and Nikki Giovanni. They and many others have met and have been painted by the artist, Jerome W. Jones, Jr. After meeting and seeing Jerome’s art portfolio, The King of Pop, Michael Jackson said, “This is incredible. People need to see this.” For over 30 years Jerome has been using his original paintings to teach “THE ART OF LIFE THROUGH THE LOVE OF ART” and to inspire the young and old to use their gifts to uplift others. His son, Jeromyah Jones is following in his father’s creative footsteps as a full time artist by “Living Our Visions Everyday.” Jerome received his Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Painting and Printmaking from Virginia Commonwealth University in 1980. Jeromyah is a 2011 Bachelor of Arts degree graduate in Comprehensive Art from Hampton University. They both received their art degrees in three years at the age of 21. This dynamic duo of father and son have made art a way of life as well as a creative way to make a living. They have exhibited across the nation their unique portraits and landscape paintings with a personal yet universal message that speaks to people from all walks of life. In 2007 Governor Bob McDonnell (then Attorney General) presented the...

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Video: Dark Waters Exhibit

RICHMOND, Va (WTVR) – In celebration of Black History Month, Richmond Department of Parks, Recreation and Community Facilities has a new art exhibit, ‘Dark Waters’ currently on display in Pine Camp’s Spotlight Gallery showcasing the works of local African American artists. Jeromyah Jones, one of the featured artists along with Lashaun Casselle brought along a few paintings.Click Click Here to Watch...

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Video: Black History Museum

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